Clinic Corner: New Hours!

August E-News

The Butte Humane Society Veterinary Clinic is excited to announce new hours of operation starting August 16th! The clinic will be open to the public from 9:00am to 12pm and 1:30pm to 5:00pm Tuesday through Friday. Our clinic provides high quality, low cost veterinary care including preventative and wellness exams, spay and neuter, vaccines, dental cleanings, heartworm prevention, and MUCH MORE! Have you put off a high dollar procedure for your pet because of the cost? The Butte Humane Society Veterinary Clinic now offers ScratchPay financing for any procedures totaling over $200.00! Applying for ScratchPay is easy, and they offer a variety of payment plans for qualifying clients. Call today to schedule your pet’s examination to make sure they are on track with their preventatives and have the best shot at a long, happy, and healthy life! 530.343.7917 x 202.

Clinic Corner: Allergy Awareness Month

May E-News

May is National Pet Allergy Awareness month! According to a recent survey, more than half of pet owners aren’t aware their dog or cat can also be miserable with seasonal allergies in the spring and summer months as well as suffer from environmental or food allergies year round! Symptoms of allergies can be as simple as sneezing, watery eyes, or itchy skin all the way up to intestinal distress, ear issues, and respiratory problems. The are a couple of precautionary steps pet owner’s can take to prevent things like food and environmental allergies such as keeping your pet on a grain free food (most dogs have some type of grain sensitivity or allergy), using all-natural cleaners in your home, and keeping plants that are toxic to pets out of your home and yard. Seasonal allergies are often hard to prevent, but knowing the signs and symptoms of allergies can help save your pet from seasonal allergy suffering.

If you think your pat may have allergies, an exam with a veterinarian is a good start to determine what type of allergies they are, and what you can do to treat them! Call us today to schedule your pet’s allergy exam at 530-343-7917 x 202.

Clinic Corner: Heartworm Awareness Month

April E-NewsApril is Heartworm Awareness Month! The Butte Humane Society Clinic is a proud member of the American Heartworm Association and we are committed to keeping our clients informed and educated to best protect their pets. Did you know that both cats and dogs have been diagnosed with heartworm in all 50 states? While heartworm is more common in dogs, cats are at risk for contracting heartworms as well.

The best offense is a good defense when it comes to preventing heartworm infections! Because of the large mosquito population in Northern California, there are as few as 6 and as many as 25 confirmed heartworm infections per veterinary clinic in our region! Monthly heartworm prevention should be given for the life of your pet; we recommend that your pet starts on monthly heartworm prevention by the time they are 6 months old and have a heartworm test every year to make sure everything is working as it should.

Unfortunately, if left untreated, heartworm disease can be fatal. Heartworm disease affects the heart, lungs and pulmonary blood vessels of pets and can be fatal to both dogs and cats. Annual testing and monitoring is important- even if they are on heartworm prevention, because prevention (as with human flu vaccines, etc.) are not 100% effective, and infected dogs can be successfully treated. The earlier the infection is caught- the easier it is to treat! There are no approved treatments for cats, but supportive care can help manage complications.

Has it been over a year since your pet’s last heartworm test? Give our clinic a call today to schedule your exam and heartworm test with our vet and pick up your pet’s heartworm prevention prescription today!

Clinic Corner: Spring into Health

March E-NewsSpring is just around the corner! With the upcoming season change, now is the perfect time to prepare your pets for warmer weather and all that accompanies it! One of the biggest complaints we hear from pet owners as the weather starts to warm up is: the fleas are back! We recommend keeping your pet on a year round flea preventative which helps prevent fleas from ever entering your home- it’s important to make sure your pet is up to date on their flea prevention as warm weather makes them more susceptible to becoming a host for those pesky bugs. Warmer weather also often means spending more time outside for your pets, and specifically more trips to parks or other pet friendly venues for dogs. Make sure your pet is up to date on their vaccines before allowing them to visit areas frequented by other animals to help give them the best chance of being protected from catching a virus from a “carrier” or another sick animal. Not sure what treatments or vaccines are best for your pet based on your lifestyle? Has it been longer than a year since your pet’s last check-up with a veterinarian? Vet care for your furry family member isn’t one size fits all, contact our clinic for information on the best options for your pet! (530) 343-7917.

Heat Safety for Your Furry Friend

dog in poolSchool is out and summer is here.  Time to get outside and enjoy some fun in the sun, right?  Well not so much for Fido or Fluffy.  Sure your best friend loves to play outside with you and keep you company while you run your errands, but when summer temperatures in Butte County reach upwards of 115 degrees, now is good time to consider taking steps to protect your pet.

We love where we live, but it’s no secret that the North Valley is prone to dry, miserable heat.  Prolonged exposure to high temperatures can cause significant, irreversible harm to your pets. So, what can you do to help your pets in this heat?

 

Leave Your Pet At Home

Despite warnings, every year people take their pets shopping with them thinking, “I’ll just be a minute” or, “It’s okay because the windows are cracked.” But it only takes that “minute” for your best friend to overheat.

On an 85 degree day inside a car:
10 minutes = 102°F
30 minutes = 120°F
*At 107°F dogs begin suffering brain damage or even death.

Shelter and Shadedog water
Got a fancy doghouse?  If that dog house is not well ventilated, it might as well be an oven.  As for that shade, it moves.  Your dog might be chilling in the cool shade of your neighbor’s oak in the morning when you leave for work, but where is that shade several hours later in the hottest part of the day? 

Keep It Full And Keep It Cool
You remembered to fill that water dish, but has it been warming in the sun?  Is it in a heat retaining metal bowl? Just like you, dogs and cats prefer cooler water.

If The Ground Is Too Hot For Your Feet, It’s Too Hot For Theirs
A dog’s feet can and will burn, blister, or bleed if it’s hot enough.  If your dog is limping or refusing to walk while outside, that’s likely a warning sign.  Dogs that have just been rampaging through the water are especially at risk as the water may have softened their pads.

 

Summer Safety Do’s And Don’ts
Do:

  • get your pup a small wading pool to splash around in.
  • make frozen treats for your dog, or freeze a block of water and let them play with it.
  • consider shaving your dog’s heavy coat; just not too short as dogs get sunburns too.
  • consider how far you take your pet from the nearest emergency facility.
  • learn from Cesar Millan how to cool down a hot dog.

Don’t:

  • exercise your pet mid-afternoon.
  • encourage your pet to speed up when it wants to slow down.