Press Release: Holiday Tribute Card Program

BUTTE HUMANE SOCIETY TO OFFER HOLIDAY TRIBUTE CARDS

Help Local Animals in Need While Getting Your Holiday Gift-Giving Done


(CHICO, CA) — Butte Humane Society’s tribute card program enables you to make a meaningful holiday gift that gives back to local animals in need while honoring your loved one.

To send a holiday tribute card, go online to buttehumane.org/tributes to make a secure donation to Butte Humane Society, select a mailed or e-mailed card, and include a personalized message to the recipient of your choice. Each card will acknowledge the gift made to Butte Humane Society on behalf of the person receiving the card.

Since Butte Humane Society does not receive regular funding from any governmental agency or humane organization, the holiday season is an ideal opportunity to support fundraisers like the Holiday Tribute Cards program in order to help the organization raise much-needed funds for the new year.  Each donation made enables Butte Humane Society to continue its quality animal care, adoption, and low-cost spay/neuter programs, and cover the necessary costs this requires.

To send a holiday tribute card or find out more about other holiday gift-giving fundraisers for Butte Humane Society, visit www.buttehumane.org.

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Press Release: Angel Card Trees

BUTTE HUMANE SOCIETY SEEKS LOCATIONS FOR “ANGEL CARD TREES” 

Free Ornaments Offered during Annual Holiday Giving Campaign


(CHICO, CA) — Butte Humane Society is seeking high-traffic business locations to host a holiday tree for the annual Angel Card Trees giving campaign.

Each Angel Card Tree is adorned with ornaments featuring animals adopted from Butte Humane Society. Community members are urged to take home an ornament, perhaps for their tree or for a friend, to share in the love of the season. Each ornament has an attached donation envelope that may be used to make a tax-deductible donation to Butte Humane Society. The tree and ornaments are provided by Butte Humane Society to business locations willing to host it throughout December.

If you have a busy retail store, restaurant or other business and would like to host an Angel Card Tree, please contact us.

Since Butte Humane Society does not receive regular funding from any governmental agency or humane organization, the holiday season is an ideal opportunity to support fundraisers like the Angel Card Trees program in order to help the organization raise much-needed funds for the new year.  Each donation made enables Butte Humane Society to continue its quality animal care, adoption, and low-cost spay/neuter programs, and cover the necessary costs this requires.

For more information on Angel Card Trees and other holiday fundraising programs for Butte Humane Society, visit www.buttehumane.org.  

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Fostering Love at Butte Humane Society

If you’ve been looking for a relatively simple way to help animals in need, have a little time on your hands and want to care for a dog or cat on a temporary basis, becoming a foster parent for your local shelter may be the perfect opportunity for you.

There are many situations in which shelter animals can greatly benefit from living with a foster family while waiting to be adopted, said Sheila Henson, Foster Coordinator at Butte Humane Society in Chico.

“We care for animals that are sick, have behavioral issues that need extra attention, or are too young to care for themselves,” she said. “If these animals do not have a foster home to go to their issues can worsen, which decreases their adoptability at a shelter. Foster parents save the lives of animals that need that little extra help.”

Some examples of animals in need of fostering are: puppies or kittens who are not old enough to be adopted, orphaned babies that require round-the-clock care, or babies and adults who are recovering from illness or surgery.

While most shelters try to make animals comfortable during their stay, shelter life can be stressful at times.

“With animals in such close quarters, illnesses can be spread quickly,” Henson said. “It is much easier for an animal to recover from illness or work out their behavior issues when they are in a home and getting lots of attention and love.”

Requirements to become a foster parent vary from shelter to shelter, but in most cases you will need to be able to provide transportation to and from the shelter, have a flexible schedule with the ability to separate foster pets from current pets in the household. If you rent your apartment or home, you will likely need written approval from your landlord.

So if you have a little extra time on your hands and some extra love in your heart, consider volunteering as a foster parent to an animal at your local shelter.

-Jen Burke, Butte Humane Society volunteer

Three of the 1500+ kittens received by BHS this summer

Don’t Shop – Adopt!

If you’re in the market for a new dog, you’ve probably done research on the breed you want to bring home. From size and weight to personality traits, there are many things to consider when searching for the perfect dog for you and your family. But there is another piece of dog-buying research that is crucial in choosing your new best friend – where he was bred. Before you bring home your new pooch you should be familiar with the term “puppy mill” and understand the consequences of supporting this type of breeding.

Puppy mills are large-scale commercial dog breeding operations where profit is given higher priority than the wellbeing of the animal, according to the ASPCA. Rather than being treated as living creatures, dogs in puppy mills are treated as machines that exist only to produce puppies for profit. Typically, the precious pups you see in the window at pet stores are a product of puppy mills.

Unlike responsible breeders, puppy mills are not concerned with producing the healthiest puppies possible – their main priority is to create as many puppies as they can, without consideration of genetic quality. By doing this, puppy mills produce generations of dogs with hereditary defects such as epilepsy, kidney disease, heart disease, deafness, eye problems and respiratory disorders.

The dogs in puppy mills are typically housed in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions without adequate veterinary care, food, water and socialization, according to the ASPCA. Female dogs are often used to breed until they are physically depleted, then killed.

The best way to avoid supporting puppy mills is to not buy puppies from pet stores. Instead, consider adopting a puppy or adult dog from your local shelter. You’ll not only pay much less than you would a breeder or pet store, but you’ll be supporting your community and helping a dog in need. Visit your local shelter today to meet some of the sweet dogs available for adoption.

– Jen Burke,  Butte Humane Society volunteer

 

The Bark ‘n’ Meow: Furry Friends for Students

 Grumpy, black and white cat

Oh tail-tugs! The university students have returned, which means the shelter is going to get busy with young adults looking for new companions.

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small poodleI think that’s great, personally. The students are far from home, away from family and their childhood pets. They’re going to be feeling homesick, and what better way to be comforted than with a soft, loyal friend?

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Grumpy, black and white catYea, but are these kids ready for the responsibility of owning a new pet? Dogs and cats not only require shelter and food, but they need regular exercise and can end up costing more than they expect.

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Valerie, grey catWell, the staff at Butte Humane don’t have soft whiskers when it comes to who they adopt animals to. They love these animals enough to make sure they are going to safe homes and responsible pet owners.

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dog mascotWhat’s more, they send these pets out into the world with a clean bill of health and the inability to breed. I’d say it’s a top-dog decision to commit to a shelter animal rather than find a free kitten or puppy willy-nillly.

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Grumpy, black and white catWell, I suppose you’re right. Those students do keep my job active and they give my friends a better chance at tail-wagging and affection. You know what I think would be great? It would be nice to find sponsors who could pair up with student adopters as mentors to the responsibilities of pet ownership.

…..Well, it was just a thought.

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small poodle

I’d like to know what our audience thinks? Do YOU have any advice for students looking for a pet companion?

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.By Sarah Brown